History of Whitsunday Islands

History of Whitsunday Islands
Before tourism could make money, the Whitsundays were used for logging. Aboriginal people had traditionally used the trees here for timber, which might account for references in Captain Cook's diary about grasslands when he first came here.
White settlers did the same, after the Aboriginal population had dwindled away through European diseases and bloodshed. Nowadays, there is no visible trace of logging ever having happened in the Whitsundays (except for the old dam that was used by the sawmill on Sawmill Creek in Cid Harbour Whitsunday Island), although on Hook there are two clues of previous industry. One is that at the Nara inlet there are Aboriginal cave paintings. This can be accessed by boat, either on private charter (bareboating) or on one of the backpacker sailing yachts who sometimes stop in. The second is that if you stay on Hook (and on some other islands) you may hear bleating in the forest. Goats were introduced by the colonialists so that ship wreck survivors could find food and later so that loggers could have something to hunt in the event that food ran out.
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